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Future Airline Safety Instructions Will Be Given By Game Apps

samzenpus posted about 5 months ago | from the playing-it-safe dept.

Transportation 64

vrml (3027321) writes "They revealed the existence of their project only to aviation safety specialists at the recent FAA Conference on Cabin Safety in Philadelphia (PDF). Now a team of Italian researchers from the HCI Lab of the University of Udine has publicly released the first in a set of aviation safety apps on which they are working. Their mission is to propose novel, first-of-their-kind solutions to a well-known problem in aviation safety: passengers lack preparedness about what to do in aircraft emergencies, and do not pay attention or do not clearly comprehend the pre-flight briefings and safety cards used by airlines to instruct them about safety. So the project is re-inventing safety cards and briefings with new media, turning them into games and apps. The first game they decided to release focuses specifically on the 'Brace for impact' position: players can pose the body of their avatar in the 3D airplane cabin and get a personalized simulation of a crash landing . To win the game, you must save your avatar (and yourself)."

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Oh great (0)

Opportunist (166417) | about 5 months ago | (#46722271)

That will do wonders to those that already have a fear of flying.

Next time those safety precautions are being explained, entertain yourself by looking around at your fellow flight guests. It's not like you're missing anything, if the plane comes crashing down having your tray table up won't safe you, so you can just as well enjoy the instructions.

Take a look around. Watch those that are deadly afraid of flying go pale (usually no later than when the instructions get to the "in case of cabin pressure loss" point). And now imagine these people having to go through the interactive experience of crashing.

I think the pre-flight safety drivel will get a lot more entertaining...

Re:Oh great (5, Insightful)

stoborrobots (577882) | about 5 months ago | (#46722645)

It's not like you're missing anything, if the plane comes crashing down having your tray table up won't safe you...

This is an example of where a lack of understanding of the risks involved leads to a lack of appreciation of the safety requirement.

You're right: in a "falling out of the air" crash where the aircraft is destroyed, having the tray table secured won't save you.

However, the vast majority of aircraft don't fall out of the sky.

Let's consider the real likely outcomes:

The plane touches down a little too fast, and decelerates particularly hard. Almost certainly all the passengers will survive. Having your tray table down allows it to fly upwards as a result of the braking force, hitting your chin on the way through and giving you either severe whiplash, a broken jaw, or a concussion. Having your tray table secured will ensure that none of those happen, and the worst possible outcome is moderate whiplash.

Similarly with having the seat back upright vs reclined: a passenger thrown forward as a result of the rapid deceleration is more likely to hit a reclined seat (which is thus closer to them) than an upright one.

Being in the brace position means that your body is as far forward as it physically can go, which reduces the likelihood that your head or arms are thrown forward into the seat in front.

The safety instructions are not there to help you survive a destructive crash, they're there to reduce the number of injuries you receive in a non-fatal crash.

Re:Oh great (3, Interesting)

antifoidulus (807088) | about 5 months ago | (#46722819)

The safety instructions are not there to help you survive a destructive crash, they're there to reduce the number of injuries you receive in a non-fatal crash.

Actually it's sort of both. If the plane crashes and everyone doesn't die instantly then your chances of survival are really high if you just make sure to get out of there as soon as possible, often times post-crash fires claim more lives than the initial crash does.

Also if you crash on water, get the hell out of there and don't inflate your life jacket till you've left the airplane [wikipedia.org]

Re:Oh great (1)

Joce640k (829181) | about 5 months ago | (#46723117)

Actually it's sort of both. If the plane crashes and everyone doesn't die instantly then your chances of survival are really high if you just make sure to get out of there as soon as possible, often times post-crash fires claim more lives than the initial crash does.the airplane

Yep, I saw that documentary too.

Your chances of survival are mostly dependent on how close you are to the emergency exit and how many people you can beat to the door. Remember that the cabin may be full of smoke and you won't be able to see/hear a damn thing, you'll be doing it by feel so count the rows when you sit down and know which way to go.

Also important is to position your legs well so they don't get broken when the seat collapses (they're designed to collapse to absorb impact). Broken legs are a common injury and impede your egress considerably.

Re:Oh great (1)

bickerdyke (670000) | about 5 months ago | (#46722909)

OK, but where does the live vests come in this scenarion of a taxiway fender-bender?

Re:Oh great (1)

stoborrobots (577882) | about 4 months ago | (#46745123)

Nothing I said is limited to landings on runways (other than my use of the phrase "touches down"). Yeah, my wording was a little sloppy, which made it sound like I was talking about a "taxiway fender-bender", but I meant in any situation where the pilot makes an unexpected landing, whether on land or water.

If the plane lands in a way which leads to the plane disintegrating, nothing will save you.

If the plane lands in a way which is unusual, but leaves large chunks of the plane undestroyed, following simple safety procedures will significantly reduce the amount of physical injury you experience.

The safety instructions contemplate the latter situation, not the former.

Re:Oh great (0)

MrBigInThePants (624986) | about 5 months ago | (#46722937)

I am sorry have you actually listened to one? They are a waste of time.
You would be far better off making sure safety equipment is standardised across airlines (if not already) and clearly labelled and its purpose obvious. You can leave the cards in the seats as people are bored on planes and will usually read them at least once.

The information in those demonstrations is trivial and hardly helpful once put to the test. People will panic and that means that little boring sermon will mean almost nothing where it counts.(as always happens)
But of course authoritarians always see the solution to non-compliance as more enforcement, regardless of the evidence. Hence why they try to "enforce" the demonstration on everyone leading to people actively not listening in protest.

And it suffers from the old catch 22: The sort of person that is going to be an idiot during an emergency will be an idiot regardless - a boring safety message will not save them.

Re:Oh great (2)

Joce640k (829181) | about 5 months ago | (#46723083)

I think a live demonstration of putting on a life vest is worth more than any drawing on a piece of paper.

Re:Oh great (1)

MrBigInThePants (624986) | about 5 months ago | (#46729733)

What they do is place a deflated piece of plastic over their head and pretend pull on a cord.
That is hardly a live demonstration worth the effort.

Not all demonstrations are equal.

If you want people to remember you would do live drills. Nothing else really works.

Re:Oh great (1)

Raumkraut (518382) | about 5 months ago | (#46723381)

The information in those demonstrations is trivial and hardly helpful once put to the test. People will panic and that means that little boring sermon will mean almost nothing where it counts.(as always happens)

Perhaps we should be campaigning for people to undergo aircraft-emergency simulations?
You're right that people panic, but people only panic because the situation is unusual. If people regularly experience "emergency" situations without the danger/fear (especially throughout childhood), they can be trained in what to do enough that handling a real emergency becomes routine and practically instinctual.

Re:Oh great (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46723823)

I visited a primary school a few months back. Haven't been to one for a long time (like, 30 plus years?)

Two interesting things. First when we arrived they talked briefly about emergency procedures. Everywhere is supposed to do that. Hotels. Offices. Everywhere. Nowhere does, except schools because hey, teaching people how to follow rules is like 25% of all they do there so it comes naturally.

Secondly, guess what they told us was the best way to know where to go and what to do if alarms sounded? Follow the kids. Why? Because the average kid at that school has done a dozen emergency drills and every time they did anything wrong people didn't say "Ha, in a real fire that would be dangerous, but yeah I understand why you went back for your handbag and then tried to take the elevator, I'd do the same probably" they said "No, that's wrong. Let's go through the instructions again" until the kids got it right. So it's stuck in their heads.

Most people suck in an emergency. Not because they have to suck, not because it's impossible NOT to suck. Just because they never bothered to pay any attention, to practice anything, to take the slightest interest. Because we all accept that, we all say "Well, I can't be bothered to hold a fire drill" "I never check that indicator myself, I guess I should but I don't" "We can do it later" and so on.

A teenage girl was in a speedboat with her dad and kid sister. The dad fucked up, half-rolled the boat and both he and the younger daughter were thrown out. He wasn't wearing a kill leash, so the engine kept running.. The terrified girl left in the boat eventually got the boat to slow, and to turn, and tried to alert a passenger ship. She waved at them. Guess what? They waved back and continued on their way. NOBODY had ever told that girl "Here's how to signal distress and get help". She had no idea what to do except wave. There were no flares on the boat, and no radio, but again she'd never been trained to use a flare or a radio either. MAYBE if there had been a DSC radio (modern digital boat radio) she'd have realised you can just press the friendly red "Oh fuck! Help!" button and help will come. Maybe. But there was no radio at all.

So after the passenger ship left she tried to rescue her father and sister herself. Unsurprisingly (ever tried to lift a dead weight out of the water?) she couldn't help them. She eventually almost ran into some fishermen, close enough to talk, and they tried to help. Both accident victims died.

Preparedness. Think about emergencies. You will not have time to learn during the emergency so anything you'd wish you knew you must learn BEFORE IT HAPPENS.

Re:Oh great (1)

stoborrobots (577882) | about 4 months ago | (#46745171)

I fly between 4 and 6 sectors per month, on average. I can practically recite the various safety briefings for two different airlines, across 5 different aircraft types. Yes, I've heard them. Yes, I find it ridiculous that after 30 years of flying, I still have to listen to them telling people how to put on their seatbelt. And I'm certainly not a fan of blind adherance to authoritarian protocols.

However, I have had experience in designing risk minimisation procedures, and safety/security system design. And over the many flights I've been on, I've frequently thought about how I would re-design the process, if I was appointed benevolent dictator over the aviation industry.

Ultimately, the question is: what process will increase the chance that the average person on the average flight will do the right thing under emergency conditions? (With the secondary goal of providing the least annoyance to regular customers.)

* Some sort of opt-out for those who fly frequently on the same service? How would you record/manage it?

* Only taking new customers through the briefing? Now you have to do the spiel 25 times for 25 different passengers in different parts of the plane, rather than once for all 190 passengers.

* Pre-flight training? On that scale?

* Better designed spiels? What would need to be included? What could we take out?

* More detailed instructions? Then they'd be longer and even less interesting than at present...

* Humour? (Like the Independence Air celebrity safety briefings?)

And when I think through the options and all the implications, the best thing I can come up with amounts to little more than minor tweaking to the existing safety demonstration.

Some tips (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46724069)

Count seats to the nearest exit when you are boarding and remember how many and which way to go.

Remember your bubbles always go upwards. In the event you find your self underwater, follow your bubbles upward.

Know how to undo your seatbeat even if upside down or in heavy smoke.

Don't try to bring your luggage/carry-on off the plane. You can replace that stuff.

Exit fast.

Re:Oh great (1)

ledow (319597) | about 5 months ago | (#46722773)

More importantly, please tell me what's in the pre-flight safety check.

Chances are that you've heard it so many times that you could give it.

Your belt clips around your waist. You undo by lifting the buckle. Your oxygen mask will drop down from the overhead compartment. Your exits are here, here and here, etc. etc. etc.

The danger of the pre-flight "safety" check is that it's nonsensical to do it. Emergency measures should not be designed that people have to learn to use them. They should be clearly marked, with - at most - one simple diagrammatic instruction. If you can't make them that simple, redesign them.

Same goes for nautical safety but there's a lot more to go wrong by your own hands on a ship. In a plane, well, you're just holding onto your own backside and hoping it all goes okay no matter what.

Honestly, I think it's about time we scrapped them. They tell us nothing we'll remember in an emergency, even though we've memorised every step. They talk about extreme situations that happen in extraordinarily rare circumstances. They scare passengers who are nervous. And yet, pretty much, studies show that in an emergency it's every man for himself and we'll all forget the briefing anyway.

Take the briefing away. Take the flight safety card away, Put simplified instructions everywhere (oxygen mask is here, pull to start flow, with a little diagram). Let people relax on their flight without being FORCED to sit through a briefing they are desperate to shut the hell up so they can sleep.

If you want to have the briefing, do this - hand out a little app that lets you do it on a personal basis.

Most importantly - SHUT THE HELL UP on flights. Let people relax, sleep and journey and then - when an emergency happens - they won't be so stressed that they do quite so stupid things.

If you know it so well, that's the point (2)

dfm3 (830843) | about 5 months ago | (#46723897)

If you're so familiar with the safety briefing that you could give it yourself, then the briefings are working *exactly* as they are intended to!
Emergency preparedness is intended to drill these practices into you so that when the time comes, you don't have to think about what to do, you know what to do. Believe me, in a panic situation most ill prepared people don't calmly assess their surroundings and take the time to look for the instructions, but their first reaction is to get themselves out of harm's way as soon as possible. How do I find that emergency exit now that the cabin is filled with smoke? I looked for it when I boarded and I know that it is two rows behind me. Someone who has never been told to look for this exit may not even realize that it is there, nor will they think to look for the patterns in the lights on the floor that indicate you are at an exit row.

I am a very frequent flier, and could give the safety briefing myself, but I still make an effort to put down what I'm doing and pay attention. Why? Because I want to set an example for those who *should* be listening, since I don't want something that they do in a panic later to cause me harm.

Re:If you know it so well, that's the point (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46723939)

I just spent my last two mod points above you, but you deserve the lot! Excellent point!

Re:If you know it so well, that's the point (1)

lmcgeoch (1298209) | about 5 months ago | (#46728231)

They should give free meals or drinks to the passengers that can do the briefings along with the aircraft attendants. It would at least make it more interesting.

Re:If you know it so well, that's the point (1)

dfm3 (830843) | about 5 months ago | (#46730003)

Here's one better: give everybody a safety orientation quiz before boarding, and those with the best scores get their choice of an aisle or window seat, choice of exit row or no exit row, and guaranteed space in an overhead bin. Oh, and the ability to select a non-sweaty seatmate. Put everybody else in the back and separate them by a soundproof door along with anybody flying with an infant-in-arms. Do that, and I won't even need the drink...

Re:Oh great (1)

ShoulderOfOrion (646118) | about 5 months ago | (#46732125)

Seriously, in order to save a few minutes and pennies, the airlines probably would scrap them if they could.

At least in the U.S., the safety briefings are mandated by the FAA: see FAR 91.519 and FAR 91.1035. As a private pilot, I'm required to give the same sort of briefing to any passengers I carry before takeoff. (Basically, "here's how to fasten the seat belt; here's how to open the door; please don't do that in flight.") Getting the FAA to modify those regs will probably require something between an Act of Congress and an Act of God.

Re: Oh great (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46722903)

So not hurting some people's feelings is more important to you than having everybody do the right thing in case of an emergency? I hope I never have to rely on you in such a case.

Re: Oh great (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 5 months ago | (#46723079)

Hate to break it to you, but people will behave like stupid dolts in an emergency situation anyway, safety instruction or not. Let's all move to the exits in an orderly manner... yeah, right. If you have any moral problems with using kids as a stepping stone on your way to the top of the pile of humans trying to get to the exit, it's been a pleasure to have known you.

Re: Oh great (1)

Joce640k (829181) | about 5 months ago | (#46728751)

I always figured the fastest way to the exit would be over the top of the seats. Anybody who goes for the isle is a fool.

Then again: I mainly fly RyanAir and when I do I always pay the extra $10 for reserved seats in the exit row. I don't have to worry about where the door is because I'll be the one opening it.

Re: Oh great (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 5 months ago | (#46732149)

An experiment where they said the first 20 (or was it 50?) people to the door get 50 bucks showed the fastest way: It's not over the top of the seats. It's over the top of the other passengers...

Re: Oh great (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46754063)

And you'll do your duty as an exit seat resident by waving over other passengers and helping everyone else exit your exit before you exit it. Right? Last time I sat in an exit row (2-3 years ago) that's what the instruction manual said. If you're sitting in an exit seat you're supposed to be one of the last people to leave the aircraft.

Re:Oh great (1)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | about 5 months ago | (#46725685)

If the plane comes crashing down having your tray table up won't safe you, so you can just as well enjoy the instructions.

No, but if the plane crashes on landing and I need to evacuate from the window seat, the last thing I want do is squeeze past your tray table so I can GTFO. Seat pitch is bad enough as it is without having to squeeze past a table so you can play Angry Birds on final approach..

Re:Oh great (1)

Joce640k (829181) | about 5 months ago | (#46728761)

The exit rows don't have fold-down tables (for that very reason).

Re:Oh great (1)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | about 5 months ago | (#46730711)

The exit rows don't have fold-down tables (for that very reason).

Not really true - Most exit-rows have fold-down tray tables in the seat in front of them, e.g.:

http://patstravelreviews.com/w... [patstravelreviews.com]

Usually you only see them in the armrest when you have this situation:

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_3TIF... [blogspot.com]

Re:Oh great (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 5 months ago | (#46732159)

I don't know what airlines you fly with, but in the ones I fly on there is enough time not only to fold up the table but to actually build a new one from toothpicks if need be between final approach and when you finally can hope that someone opens that damn door.

Damm! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46722287)

I HATE underwater levels.

*too soon?*

Re:Damm! (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 5 months ago | (#46722605)

If you want to win a tasteless award, you have to do better than that. A local TV station just started Lost reruns two weeks ago.

If done well... (1)

T-Bucket (823202) | about 5 months ago | (#46722327)

I hope it's like that "stair dismount" game from a few years back. Pick a position, crash the plane, and get points for how injured your passenger is!

Re:If done well... (1)

Big Hairy Ian (1155547) | about 5 months ago | (#46723103)

It's probably just Snakes on a Plane & Ladders

Re:If done well... (1)

Jack Malmostoso (899729) | about 5 months ago | (#46723547)

Porrasturvat. So much wasted time.

New meaning for "Get to the Exit" (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | about 5 months ago | (#46722467)

I would love to see a Double Dragon style brawler where you tried to make your way to the emergency exit as fast as possible, bonus points for knocking back into seats people trying to extract heavy overhead items to take with them down the slide.

Or those simply too slow, but then you'd lose points for that - unless you carried them...

Re:New meaning for "Get to the Exit" (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 5 months ago | (#46722581)

I'd hope for an angry mob killing the player if he tried to get his laptop out with him in an emergency.

I sure as hell know I would kill him. Anyone valuing his laptop higher than the life of the people around him should be removed from the gene pool, for we all are better off without him.

Re:New meaning for "Get to the Exit" (1)

bickerdyke (670000) | about 5 months ago | (#46722921)

I would love to see a Double Dragon style brawler where you tried to make your way to the emergency exit as fast as possible, bonus points for knocking back into seats people trying to extract heavy overhead items to take with them down the slide.

Sounds like a normal scene after arriving at the gate with a cheap airline.

Do I have to? (1)

Sigvatr (1207234) | about 5 months ago | (#46722623)

Will they kick me off the plane if I lose the game?

Re:Do I have to? (1)

drkim (1559875) | about 5 months ago | (#46722785)

Will they kick me off the plane if I lose the game?

No... I believe the gaming all happens at the boarding gate. You're not allowed on the plane until you get a perfect score on the emergency testing.

Of course, if you do TOO well on the First-Person-Shooter part of the testing, the TSA will take you aside for extra screening.

Re:Do I have to? (1)

sunderland56 (621843) | about 5 months ago | (#46723991)

No... I believe the gaming all happens at the boarding gate. You're not allowed on the plane until you get a perfect score on the emergency testing.

In other news: airlines have banned everyone over the age of 40 from ever flying again.

Re:Do I have to? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46723003)

"Ladies and gentlemen, this is your Captain crashing, er, I mean speaking. We will be landing shortly. Please fasten your smartphones in the upright position and extinguish the person next to you. Please do not blink until the aircraft has come to a full stop at the terminal building. Thank you for flying Digital Airlines."

Gameplay problem (1)

91degrees (207121) | about 5 months ago | (#46722745)

The problem is, if I can get my avatar into a position where he's catapulted across the plane, that's a lot more satisfying than actually winning the game.

Re:Gameplay problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46724425)

At that point you know what NOT to do. Hopefully that sticks with you.

Stupid idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46722869)

People understand the safety card just fine, the problem is that in an actual emergency people rarely react rationally. They either revert to "OMG I'M GOING TO DIE, SAVE ME, SCREW EVERONE ELSE, *PANIC*" or they take the placid attitude of what will be will be.

You see this all the time despite safety exercises and evacuation drills, if the building is actually on fire most people will run down the fire stairs (not in a 2by2 orderly fashion), and some special people will run to the elevator.

Re:Stupid idea (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 5 months ago | (#46723113)

As is normal. Seriously, what do you expect? People will do what is necessary to avoid death. Ok, most people would. And bluntly, so would I. Sorry, but I don't make a good martyr. If I need to get out of a building to save my life and your 4 year old is in the way, get him out of the way if you want him to live.

Re:Stupid idea (1)

Viol8 (599362) | about 5 months ago | (#46724269)

Agreed. I've been in a panic i-might-die situation once in my life and anyone who believes you can think rationally in that situation without a LOT of training is wrong. Fear takes over and fear is the most powerful emotion we have.

Re:Stupid idea (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 5 months ago | (#46726239)

Actually, the rational action would be to ensure you make it to the door before it's too late. The only thing a baby in your path would change is that you might consider wiping your boot clean after you're out.

Makes sense (1)

The_Noid (28819) | about 5 months ago | (#46722953)

âoeTell me, and I will forget. Show me and I may remember. Involve me, and I will understand.â

The safety instructions are mostly just telling, because the showing part is, for most passengers, too far away and happens too fast to be useful. Anything that forces the learner to actually do something with the material himself works much better than just telling the material.

Finally out (1)

Tablizer (95088) | about 5 months ago | (#46722967)

Duke-Dont-Nuke-Em

no phone no instructions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46722991)

So they assume that everyone is hugging their smartphone. Are we that far down the Wall-E path - everyone is heads down 100% engrossed online. I cannot but reject that "lifestyle".

Rule 1 of safety instructions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46723009)

Keep an eye on the Muzzies. If they look like they are lighting their shoes or underpants throw water on them.

Oh no (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46723579)

It's the usual problem of safety douches inventing crap to justify their own purpose. It's useless anyway.

Chinese proverb (1)

Johann Lau (1040920) | about 5 months ago | (#46723661)

Tell me, and I'll forget
Show me, and I'll remember
Involve me, and I'll understand

ugh (1)

stonebit (2776195) | about 5 months ago | (#46723865)

Just don't make me play the game. This sounds like the most boring game i will ever play.

web designing company in chennai (0)

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Forgetting the largest problem. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46724541)

What about the people who travel sans electronics such as anyone from murrica traveling to china, north korea or russia, or how about people going on vacation who leave their electronics at home and prefer to actually be disconnected for a week and enjoy them selves in a foreign country. I prefer to go analog and bring a book, which i know must be unheard of in this day and age, but there is something incredibly relaxing about sitting on a beach reading a book under a cabana.

Re:Forgetting the largest problem. (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 5 months ago | (#46724803)

or what about the extreme roaming fees that make a 10 meg down load cost $150-$200 in roaming fees

FPS competition .... (1)

PPH (736903) | about 5 months ago | (#46725325)

... against fellow passengers. Survivor collects life preserver and makes it to emergency exit. All you have to do is make it past the 400 lb ogre the cabin crew inevitably seats next to the over wing exit plug door before he gets stuck in it.

Yeah. I'm going to enjoy this game.

Venn diagram (1)

YalithKBK (2886373) | about 5 months ago | (#46726973)

I have feeling that the group of people who do not understand pictures on the safety card greatly overlaps with the people who do not understand how to download and use apps on a smartphone.

Nothing make you feel safer... (1)

AndrewBClark (948141) | about 5 months ago | (#46727999)

Nothing makes you feel safer in flight than simulating crashes and escapes. I wonder if they will also simulate the cabin breaking into pieces and crawling over bodies to make your escape.

Words have meaning (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46728207)

I know editors are hard to come by, but please let's use the right words. There's an enormous difference between "Future Airline Safety Instructions Will Be Given By Game Apps" and "Future Airline Safety Instructions Could Be Given By Game Apps".

Call it an App and... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46730241)

... play up the fact that it is a FREE GAME. Presto, you've just got the attention of about 60% of your passengers. Make it halfway interesting and it might even succeed in transmitting some boring safety content.

What if you do something wrong? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46733325)

You die? That would be kinda scary for somebody about to take off.

Oh sheez! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46737625)

You'll play, as an adult mind you, with your instructional game, but only after taking your gummy vitamins. Programming for the wiener whiner society.

Jordans For Sale (1)

fdsdiiom (3616735) | about 4 months ago | (#46754223)

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