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Education Microsoft Games

The Minecraft Parent 174

HughPickens.com writes: Michael Agger has an interesting article in the New Yorker about parenting in the internet era and why Minecraft is the one game parents want their kids to play. He says, "Screens are no longer simply bicycles for the mind; they are bicycles that children can ride anywhere, into the virtual schoolyard where they might encounter disturbing news photos, bullies, creeps, and worse. Setting a child free on the Internet is a failure to cordon off the world and its dangers. It's nuts. ... The comfort of games is that they are partially walled off from the larger Internet, with their own communities and leaderboards. But what unsettles parents about Internet gaming, despite fond memories of after-school Nintendo afternoons, is its interconnectivity. Minecraft is played by both boys and girls, unusually. ... At its best, the game is not unlike being in the woods with your best friends. Parents also join in."

According to Agger, the significance of Minecraft is how the game shows us that lively, pleasant virtual worlds can exist alongside our own, and that they are places where we want to spend time, where we learn and socialize. "To me what Minecraft represents is more than a hit game franchise," says new Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella. "It's this open-world platform. If you think about it, it's the one game parents want their kids to play." We need to meet our kids halfway in these worlds, and try to guide them like we do in the real world, concludes Agger. "Who knows how Minecraft will change under Microsoft's ownership, but it's a historic game that has shown many of us a middle way to navigate the eternal screens debate."
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The Minecraft Parent

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  • by i kan reed ( 749298 ) on Friday September 19, 2014 @10:55AM (#47946313) Homepage Journal

    Creativity is one important skill children need to develop. I think this kind of effusive praise willfully ignores that sometimes these activities can and do take the place of other important childhood activities in some cases.

    And that brings me to how I kind of lament the lack of textual information in modern games. I learned a rather large amount of reading(and vocabulary) skills by trying to understand what games were saying as a child.

    The universality of voice acting harms how much children can develop by reading.

    • Totally agree with you. Grew up playing RPG's on Sega (not to mention PTO, heh -- which spawned a lot of interest in geography and history, but i digress)
      Then Everquest, which again, a lot of reading -- and typing, since you had to actually read an NPC's dialog in order to know what to say to progress quests.

      Compared with the past couple of years: The last two RPG type games i've played (skyrim, and now Elder Scrolls Online) have characters that are entirely voice acted. I find myself clicking through the

    • Creativity is one important skill children need to develop. I think this kind of effusive praise willfully ignores that sometimes these activities can and do take the place of other important childhood activities in some cases.

      And that brings me to how I kind of lament the lack of textual information in modern games. I learned a rather large amount of reading(and vocabulary) skills by trying to understand what games were saying as a child.

      The universality of voice acting harms how much children can develop by reading.

      100% this. I hated reading as a child until I came across Final Fantasy 6.

    • Reading is overrated - it is an eyesight based function that degrades with age.

      http://www.engineersjournal.ie... [engineersjournal.ie]

      There's an insensitive clod / get off my lawn meme in this somewhere, but I can't remember how to execute it.

    • My neighbor's kid refused to learn to read ... so I started playing Fluxx with him. (specifically, Zombie Fluxx).

      As he had to read the cards to be able to play (or reveal his hand to someone else at the table), it finally pushed him over the edge to read. Once he got to the point where I was fairly certain that he had memorized the cards, we switched to Pirate Fluxx.

      These days, he uses his reading skills for reading books on Minecraft -- I saw him at the library last week checking one out.

  • I was dubious too... (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Doug Otto ( 2821601 ) on Friday September 19, 2014 @10:57AM (#47946347)
    A few weeks ago, at my kid's school, their info tech teacher mentioned that kids are much better at things like Google Sketch-up, and a lightweight CAD product they spend some time on, than they were a few years ago. She credited Minecraft as teaching them to visualize things in 3D. If that's truly the case, Satya might be on to something. That said, after about 15 minutes of hearing the music in the game I get the urge to climb a bell tower.
  • Pleasant? (Score:1, Flamebait)

    by ugen ( 93902 )

    As a parent, I don't see Minecraft through the rose-colored glasses, as it seems to be commonly described. While a game was supposed to be nonviolent, plenty of Minecraft servers seem to have added functionality that allows direct fighting and ability to kill other players. Chat capabilities go unmonitored and "adult language" is widespread.

    Due to Minecrafts de-centralized nature there are no effective technological age or content controls, leaving children (mine anyway) exposed to kinds of things that I wo

    • So....just like with any other online game, find some decent servers that don't put up with "adult language" or griefing.
      • by ugen ( 93902 )

        1. I am not in the micromanaging my kids business. Sitting next to my child every minute they are on the computer, and watching their every step is not viable. I prefer services (and games) that are designed from ground up to provide child enough freedom without having to have a permanent guard set next to them.

        2. You are making my point for me. As a game universe, in general, Minecraft is *not* nonviolent or purely creative, as it is being generally described. It has its fair share of sex, violence and use

        • Re:Pleasant? (Score:5, Interesting)

          by digital_fiz ( 762303 ) on Friday September 19, 2014 @11:15AM (#47946547) Homepage Journal
          It takes a little effort on the parents part. You don't have to micromanage just do your due diligence to make sure your kids are safe. You can make a list of "whitelisted" servers your kids can go on or create your own either by buying a realm or setting one up yourself. Then heres the magic part, you fucking pay attention to what your kids are doing, check logs occasionally or monitor the servers themselves a little. You don't just give them a toy or cell phone or laptop and say now go away (at least I hope you don't). Its not a baby sitter its entertainment and you as a parent still have to do your job. A little supervision and some research makes it a completely safe place. I have 3 kids 16, 14, 10 and they all have been playing minecraft safely for a few years now.
          • Re: (Score:1, Troll)

            by ugen ( 93902 )

            Any game that takes an effort to make "safe" cannot be described as pleasant or safe by default.
            It takes more than a little effort or research. Unless you constantly monitor servers for content or audit server list daily - you cannot claim that the game is played "safely". Server content can change at any time, and your children can add and delete servers as they see fit.

            Something is up with /. reader's ability to comprehend the material today :)

            • Re:Pleasant? (Score:5, Insightful)

              by digital_fiz ( 762303 ) on Friday September 19, 2014 @11:29AM (#47946721) Homepage Journal
              Anything you let your children do should involve a little bit of effort on the parents part ro make sure its really safe...
              • Dam,n, no mod points this week to mod you up with....

                Parenting is WORK.

              • You can simplify that sentence and make it "Anything regarding your children involve a little bit of effort on the parents part." Yes, that's the true, folks, having kids is hard work, for the rest of your life.

                More on the topic, my own 8 yo daughter never payed much attention to PC games (she loves to play on the iPad), but when she saw me playing Minecraft, she got interested. She likes to watch, and sometimes play a bit, she is still getting the hang of the keyboard+mouse controls.

                Part of the appeal is t

        • 1) Who said anything about micromanaging? Find a server that's pleasant, has some of the same values that you're hoping for (friendly, non-adult language, etc) and point your kid there. If he/she likes it, they'll stay there. 2) If you don't want your kid killing anything at all, there's always creative mode where nothing ever tries to kill you either. If breeding cattle, chickens, sheep, etc and then eating them is "sex & violence" then I don't know what to say. You can only shield your child from so m
        • by Anonymous Coward

          It has its fair share of sex, violence and useless junk. It takes a conscious and significant effort to protect players from that. This is something that articles about Minecraft seem to conveniently omit.

          Sex in minecraft? The only straw I can grasp at here is its extremely abstract animal husbandry model...

          As for policing content that you do not approve of, this is true of any scenario that involves your child interacting with other human beings...which seems to be your real issue, given that most of your objections stem from the multiplayer experience. I don't know what level of parental authority is reasonable to you, but I should hope it would include some basic supervision and boundary setting, as dig

        • Blocky, pixellated sex, I imagine.

          Kind of like the GIFs we downloaded from BBSes in the 1990s.

          My safe word is "ZMODEM".

        • Then you aren't a very good parent.

          You aren't your child's friend, you are their PARENT.

    • Re:Pleasant? (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Ogive17 ( 691899 ) on Friday September 19, 2014 @11:08AM (#47946483)
      Wow, where to start?

      While a game was supposed to be nonviolent, plenty of Minecraft servers seem to have added functionality that allows direct fighting and ability to kill other players. Chat capabilities go unmonitored and "adult language" is widespread.

      So do not let your child play, unsupervised, on these public servers. You cannot get to a server without specifically adding the server address (which you typically get by searching on the internet).

      On a personal level, it annoys me that a game world with a level of 3d graphics and physics sophistication that was state of the art 20 years ago is extremely popular today, but I can see the draw of "retro" look and feel.

      So graphics trumps gameplay for you? I still play my favorite NES/SNES games on an emulator because of how much fun they are, not what they look like.
      • by Anonymous Coward

        While a game was supposed to be nonviolent, plenty of Minecraft servers seem to have added functionality that allows direct fighting and ability to kill other players. Chat capabilities go unmonitored and "adult language" is widespread.

        So do not let your child play, unsupervised, on these public servers. You cannot get to a server without specifically adding the server address (which you typically get by searching on the internet).

        Better yet, run your own server [gamepedia.com]. It's free, easy to set up, and super fun (for my family). It also provided me with a way to make my job sound intersting to my kids (My dad runs all the Minecraft servers at his work!)

      • by phorm ( 591458 )

        When I used to play with MC, some of the most fun I have had on my friends' server was to mess with them.
        "oops, I have no idea how that lava field got underneath your farm. What, a creeper opened a hole to it and all the sheeps became BBQ. That's terrible!"
        or
        "A random which in your house which blew up a gigantic hidden stash of TnT? Where did that come from?"

      • by Anonymous Coward

        Someone doesn't understand how computationally intensive rendering voxels can be. N^3 algorithms get big fast.

        • I know when I first started I didn't have a good grasp on the work involved. I was deathly afraid of mobs, so when I encountered my first skeleton spawned, I quarried my way down to it so the sunlight would disable it. I still have that world save, with the humongous quarry hole.

          MUCH more work than I initially thought it would be.

    • My parenting approach does not include use of force or abuse of my authority, (where safety or law is not directly concerned), so I can't in good consciousness prohibit it outright.

      My god, i'd hate to behind you in line at the grocery store.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      Uh? Minecraft is supposed to be nonviolent?

      A game in which you start off fighting zombies, skeletons and exploding texture errors (creepers) to work your way to building a portal to hell (the Nether) to get the supplies you need to fight a giant dragon is nonviolent?

      Okay then. If you say so.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      On a personal level, it annoys me that a game world with a level of 3d graphics and physics sophistication that was state of the art 20 years ago is extremely popular today, but I can see the draw of "retro" look and feel.

      I'm sorry, but it certainly seems like you're a bit too uptight about this particular aspect of the game. Minecraft is not popular because it looks like 20-year old shit. It's popular because of what it does and what it brings to the players, playfully ignorant about the demand to make each subsequent release more "lifelike", unlike other franchises.

      There is no "draw" of retro look and feel outside of this particular game. Even Apple isn't bold enough, and they make one of the most fashionable pieces of

    • I tried to think of something I care less about in a video game than "level of physics sophistication", and I couldn't think of anything.

      Then I tried to think of something I care less about in a video game than "level of 3d graphics" and I thought of one thing: level of physics sophistication.

  • Answers (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward

    "Who knows how Minecraft will change under Microsoft's ownership,"

    Within 18 months:

    Java codebase abandoned in favor of either from-scratch VB.net (or some other proprietary nonsense) rewrite, or a porting of the xbone codebase back to windows.
    Support quietly dropped (if not dropped, no new updates published) for non-microsoft branded platforms.
    Some new architecture to monetize DLC and/or server mods.
    "premium" version with a subscription based revenue model.
    Two or three smaller-scale spinoff games based arou

    • by gatkinso ( 15975 )

      What is the XBox 360 version written in?

      • My understanding is it's C++, so a complete rewrite from the PC version. There's no way in hell it's Java, and I doubt they'd bother with XNA/C# if they had access to the real developer environment.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Remember companies doing "recruitment" in 2nd life? Almost same shit, different name.

    • Hell, I just did some newly published online "training" for my giant employer, and they made direct reference to their second life island in the AD 20 fucking 14.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Minecraft is *a lot* different than 2nd Life, for a lot of reasons.

      Creation is a primary gameplay activity, not something done in an external tool and then imported. When playing online, Minecraft uses a strict client/server architecture and all game objects and their behavior are defined by the server. A client cannot create and upload a scripted object or behavior to the server like in Second Life.

      Minecraft was initially created as a single player adventure and exploration game by a single person for fun.

  • My son is still too young, only 1.5 years old.. but when he's around 3 I plan to let him start fiddling around on the computer, specifically with Minecraft.

    It takes coordination, cooperation, critical thinking, and creativity to create in this game and I'm looking forward to having this be one of the activities we do together as he gets older. Of course I also cannot wait until he's old enough for legos.. I only wish I did not sell all of mine 20 years ago in a garage sale..

    I watch some stream
    • by Pontiac ( 135778 )

      My son is 8 and has been playing Minecraft for 2 years. I've seen him go from just throwing stuff together to really putting thought into design and ascetics.

      We started him out on Minecraft Pocket edition.. He can play with friends on the same lan but internet play is not all there yet so you don't have to worry about online strangers. We bought the PC version for him last year and started playing on the Reddit servers. Overall it's a good community.

      • We've been considering getting our oldest son (11) into Minecraft. He currently loves playing Disney Infinity because he can build worlds and then use his favorite characters to navigate through those worlds. Of course, at $14 per character figure, this can get expensive fast. I can get Minecraft - Pocket Edition for $7 from Amazon's app store, load it on his tablet, and set him to building.

    • My 2 year old girl runs around in Minecraft on her tablet and on a PC. Although by her behavior she must have inherited my genes from playing doom, duke nukem and the like growing up. Unless your son is isolated, I doubt you will be able to keep him from minecraft before 3.

  • This is 2014, and we're in the decade of reboots. This is the reboot of "sit your kids in front of the TV to watch the Children's Channel" thinking. The glowing, phosphorus parent of the 80s, now back with less Big Bird.

    Put your kids outside. Don't put them on the bicycle of the Internet; put them on a *real* bicycle. I walked the 1/3 mile to school when I was 6; I could bicycle 1.2 miles in that time, a good 10 minutes walking by myself, well out of sight of my parents. When I was 8, I had a bicycle

    • Well, the real truth is that some of the best predictors of adult success, as far as parenting practices are concerned, is simply time spent together in infancy and early childhood.

      Those other things are almost all certainly good ideas, but it mostly comes down to parental engagement.

      (sufficiently disengaged parents are thought to be one of the primary causes of psychopathy)

      • Sticking your child in front of a video game to parent for you is NOT engaging.

        Children need independence. Independence doesn't mean mommy isn't around; it means they make decisions and mistakes on their own, and are able to move away from their parents and return by their own action--even if they're instructed when to do so. Such instruction is engagement, as is parents asking where you're going, where you've been, what you've done, and having food prepared for you when you get home.

        We can extrapolate

    • blame mommy culture for this :(

      also, sensationalist news stories. A fluke child abduction occurs*, and is blasted on the news -- and suddenly the mommy brigade is convinced that monsters are lurking behind every corner waiting to snatch little kids.

      *IE: a instance of abduction that is NOT perpetrated by a family member.

      • It's been happening forever. In the 1500s, a Catholic Priest dedicated his efforts to attacking the mnemonics techniques used to memorize scripture--and everything else--because they attached lewd and base images to ideas in the mind. This happened after one preacher admitted he used an image of a naked virgin girl in a not-so-puritan situation to help remember some odd line of the Catholic bible. Having such thoughts in peoples's heads was unacceptable, entirely.

      • by Zynder ( 2773551 )

        monsters are lurking behind every corner waiting to snatch little kids

        I'd guess that those guys look a lot like Endermen. Just sayin :D

    • Like you said, it's 20 fucking 14. Why do you want your kids to play like it's 1814? You condemn a reboot and then suggest one. Good job!
  • .... it was never much of a videogame, more a modelling editor who's basic building block is cubes.

    All the corporate PR speak in the world can't change the fact that the game isn't really a game, just software in which to tool around in with some minor if trivial game elements.

  • Beats second life... (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Rinikusu ( 28164 ) on Friday September 19, 2014 @11:10AM (#47946497)

    A friend of mine's kid plays incessantly. Not even in kindergarten, but can build gigantic, amazing structures. And then he blows it all up. :)

    Major plus sides:
    Ability to express creativity with no real cost but time
    Ability to socialize with others without having to worry about getting beat up
    Ability to exercise lots of things, like planning. I mean, when we were kids, we built forts in trees to throw pinecones at each other, snow forts from which to throw snowballs at each other, and cardboard forts at which to shoot each other with bb guns. Now kids can kinda do the same in a video game. Plan out the fort, build the fort, then tear it all down and do it again, even better this time.
    I'm pretty impressed with the game, but haven't actually played it myself. Shame. I wish I had more time for play these days.

    • Ability to exercise lots of things, like planning.

      This might be really good for my son. He's 11 and has been diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome. One of the things he struggles with is executive function. Whereas you or I might see a task and immediately start breaking it down into subtasks, prerequisites, etc and organizing them, he struggles with this. This might help him out by giving him a task "Build a Fort in Minecraft" and making him think through the steps (e.g "build the foundation first, then t

    • Ability to socialize with others without having to worry about getting beat up

      And we wonder where the internet trolls come from...
      I mean, I get it. Parent want their kid to be safe. But when you remove the whole "do this and you will get punched in the face" aspect of social interaction, then certain behaviors fail to get snuffed out.

      We've all seen that comic about when little stephan forgets he is not online [google.com]. There's a kernel of truth to that.
      I'm sure it will help socialize them to the facts of the Internet. Like how to deal with trolls, and how to ignore annoying people, and how yo

  • Digital Lego (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Pontiac ( 135778 ) on Friday September 19, 2014 @11:13AM (#47946529) Homepage

    The best description of Micecraft I've heard is Digital Lego.

    In creative you can build anything.. My son and I built the Great Pyramid of Geza to scale on the Reddit creative server.

    Play with redstone.. lean the basic electronic circuits with switches and logic gates.

    Then switch to survival, join a community.. work with others as a team.. So many things you can do in one little game..

    Well not to call it little.. the map can have more land than 9 million earths.

  • There's a niche to be filled with parent-friendly games and Microsoft has bought a great game franchise to fill it with. Well played.
  • Minecraft, Lego, Mechano...all branches on the same tree. I don't have children, but if I did I would rather they play Minecraft than CoD Whatever: The Sequelling.

    Best of luck to Notch. Hopefully MS are good stewards of the property.

  • by apcullen ( 2504324 ) on Friday September 19, 2014 @11:26AM (#47946675)
    On the one hand, playing minecraft can be like playing with legos. I've seen my kids create amazing things in minecraft.
    With some mods, it can also teach basic programming skills and simple electric circuits.
    OTOH
    It can be modded into a pvp shooter. Not the worst thing in the world, but it sort of kills the educational value of it. It is not a safe, walled environment because, you know, other players are coming to kill you. Moreover, even in other forms of minecraft other players can come and destroy your stuff. They can also yell at you and call you names and otherwise annoy you via the chat window.
    • Is this just a problem in the PC version or can people do this in the tablet versions also? For example, if I loaded Minecraft - Pocket Edition on my son's Android tablet, could other people enter his "world" and interfere with things he made? Could they initiate chats with him (abusive or otherwise)? Can you choose to wall other people out and operate in your own "Minecraft World" and/or only allow approved people in? (For that last one, perhaps I could load up Minecraft and walk through something my s

    • It's relatively safe environment if you run your own invite-only server. If the setup is too much to handle, you can rent one.
    • You CAN choose to run a private server. My older son does this. It's not too difficult to set up-- he did it himself and only needed help with port forwarding in the router. . I believe that Minecraft Pocket Edition works in a similar way.

      But you have to go our of your way to run this way. And if you were to run this way there is still nothing to prevent a child from logging on to some other server (there are thousands).
  • Server is critical (Score:4, Interesting)

    by bugs2squash ( 1132591 ) on Friday September 19, 2014 @11:40AM (#47946875)
    I watch my son play minecraft and I like what I see... creativity, use of a commandline, interaction with his friends (he's usually on the phone to a friend who moved away across the country, so it's a good way for them to stay in touch). It's fine for half an hour a day or so. On the other hand, when I see my nephew play minecraft I'm appalled. The chat messages are full of nasty, hateful language. It seems to me that the user experience varies greatly from one server to another.
  • by King_TJ ( 85913 ) on Friday September 19, 2014 @11:42AM (#47946899) Journal

    We have 3 kids, two of whom are BIG into Minecraft. (The 3rd. one, our 11 year old daughter, just kind of played along since the other two were so into it -- but it's not really her thing.)

    IMO, any of these computer games that encourage kids to actually create and think are a good thing. The "Little Big Planet" series of games on the PS3 work a similar way (but have much better graphics, as they're not trying to do the retro, early 80's block graphic look).

    The original article's author seems to be implying that they're also a "win" for parents in the sense it gives kids a place to play and explore on the net that's still relatively safe. Unfortunately, I think that's less true than some people might think.

    Our youngest girl (a first-grader, who was able to chat/type far above her grade level) ran across a fellow Minecraft "player" who turned out to be some kind of perv -- getting kicks out of sending her links to hard-core porn photos and videos, etc. She was still too young to really get what was going on with all of that. But we had to have a talk with her and make sure she knows never to give out ANY personal information in the game -- and have to review what she's doing in the game more closely now.

    As much as there is to dislike about Sony and its money-grabbing, proprietary ways? I will say they seem to have a lot more invested in locking down the play environment - so I feel this sort of thing is less likely an issue in a game like LBP.

  • under Microsoft's ownership?"

    Did... did anyone else just feel a cold chill up their spine?

  • by VanessaE ( 970834 ) on Friday September 19, 2014 @01:09PM (#47947911) Homepage

    I don't mean to advertise here, but if language, "adult content" and so on is as big a problem as it's being made out to be on Minecraft servers, you might want to try an alternative game instead.

    Those of us who run Minetest (the open source game/engine) usually very careful about policing the users on our servers, to the point at least that adult discussions are usually not tolerated at all, and coarse language/cursing is usually equally shunned. Sometimes, depending on the server, it's okay to "blur" your curses if they're not directed at someone in an insulting manner.

    Some servers have PvP enabled, but I guess most server owners have that turned off.

    We're small, and we're not Minecraft, but I think we do okay, and besides - its fun.

    Freenode channel #minetest or http://minetest.net/ [minetest.net] if you want to take a look. And no, it's not supposed to be a Minecraft clone and it does not use any code or assets from that game. It's just supposed to be similar enough to appeal to same "sandbox" audience.

    Full disclosure: I am a modder and texture pack author for this project and have contributed a couple of small things to the engine.

    • you guys need to get the word out there. Seriously. Nobody knows you exist.

      Start by submitting a slashdot article. Slashdotters HATE Microsoft. Tell them an open source version of Minecraft exists, and you will get favorable replies.

    • by pbhj ( 607776 )

      >it's not supposed to be a Minecraft clone

      Having just looked at the site I can't really believe this. It has the same visual appearance (like Minecraft to Infiniminer but more so), the same tools in one screenshot, the same placement of the tools. From descriptions it appears to have the same general game mechanics. It doesn't have to be an exact replica to be a "clone" in game terms IMO.

      • by pbhj ( 607776 )

        I should say .. that's not a bad thing to me. I'll be trying it out for sure.

  • by quietwalker ( 969769 ) <pdughi@gmail.com> on Friday September 19, 2014 @01:19PM (#47948045)

    "Setting a child free on the Internet is a failure to cordon off the world and its dangers."

    Well, yes. At a certain point when they lack the ability to comprehend danger, that might be true. However, you can only go for so long before enforced ignorance will backfire. You think your kid's friends have the same definition of limits as you? Or the public library? Or commercials on tv for sexed up teen drama, or sexed up medical drama, or murder-sex-up-cop drama? Or the line of magazines at the grocery store proclaiming "10 ways to have SEX that will give you a SUPER-ORGASM"? Or pop music about sex, drugs, and how great it is to combine the two?

    At some point, you have to start coaching the child on the actual dangers of the world, including the internet. Especially the internet. It's ubiquitous, and once they're old enough to be a target, they're old enough to have circumvented any access restrictions you might use.

    When they're old enough to start using Minecraft, they're probably old enough to get one in a series of many talks about the world. Stranger Danger applies to emails and creepy guys on websites too, you know.

    Minecraft is not any sort of solution to this issue. It's just entertainment, and has nothing to do with it.

  • by way2slo ( 151122 ) on Friday September 19, 2014 @01:58PM (#47948439) Journal

    Put the kids on single player in a creative map and just let them create. When they get older, introduce survival mode.

    Not quite sure how they got there, but I believe it went something like this:
    1) Kids watch daddy play Minecraft and watch Paulsoaresjr's videos along with daddy. (Paul is very family friendly in his videos) They scream when surprising things happen.
    2) Kids start playing around with Daddy's copy of Minecraft PE on iPad and eventually take it over.
    3) Kids get plush Creeper stuffed animal with explosion noises from Santa and use it sneak-up and scare Daddy. Kids: (whisper) "Lets creep Daddy!" Creeper: "ssssSSSSBOOM!" Daddy: "Ahhh!" Kids: *Giggles*
    4) Kids beg Daddy to let them play Minecraft on PC and eventually Daddy sets up a single-player creative world for them. Kids show-off their creations to Parents.

    It's not all the time and as with any toy it goes in and out of their attention, but they are having a good time and I feel that it is beneficial.

    • by Pontiac ( 135778 )

      5. Daddy builds a Minecraft server PC and throws it on the LAN. 4 kids play together or alone in a server you control.
      6. Daddy bought a relm subscription.. performance was way better then the 7 year old desktop plus they can now access it from grandpas house or on vacation and let their cousin & school friends join in. I still have control as it's a whitelisted server done by invite form me.

      The kids now play on some of the public servers but I always play on them first to get a feel for the user base be

  • Our whole family loves playing Minecraft, although so far we've kept network play to our own server. For parents with young kids playing on the net, any recommendations for kid friendly servers? Ours are currently 5 and 7, so may be too young to consider letting them venture out on their own, but will be looking pretty soon probably.

  • Pardon my bluntness but; Go outside, and show your children the wonders of the natural world not a &**% screen! Nuff said.

Where there's a will, there's a relative.

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